From Goosenecks State Park to Capitol Reef National Park (UTAH)

Goosenecks State Park is a state park in the U.S. state of Utah, overlooking a deep meander of the San Juan River. The park is located near the southern border of the state a short distance from Mexican Hat, Utah.[2] Millions of years ago, the Monument Upwarp forced the river to carve incised meanders over 1,000 feet (300 m) deep as the surrounding landscape slowly rose in elevation. Eroded by water, wind, frost, and gravity, this is a classic location for observing incised meanders.

Goosenecks State Park is largely undeveloped. Primitive campsites with picnic tables are scattered back from the edge of the cliff, and vault toilets are available. Campers are advised to bring their own water, food, and other necessary gear.

There are no developed hiking trails in the park,[4] but the Honaker Trail, a few miles to the northwest, provides access to the San Juan River.[5]
















Capitol Reef National Park is a United States National Park, in south-central Utah. It is 100 miles (160 km) long but fairly narrow. The park, established in 1971, preserves 241,904 acres (978.95 km2; 377.97 sq mi) and is open all year, although May through September are the most popular months.
Called "Wayne Wonderland" in the 1920s by local boosters Ephraim P. Pectol and Joseph S. Hickman, Capitol Reef National Park protects colorful canyons, ridges, buttes, and monoliths. About 75 miles (120 km) of the long up-thrust called theWaterpocket Fold, a rugged spine extending from Thousand Lake Mountain to Lake Powell, is preserved within the park. "Capitol Reef" is the name of an especially rugged and spectacular segment of the Waterpocket Fold near the Fremont River.[3] The area was named for a line of white domes and cliffs of Navajo Sandstone, each of which looks somewhat like theUnited States Capitol building, that run from the Fremont River to Pleasant Creek on the Waterpocket Fold. The local wordreef referred to any rocky barrier to travel.[4] Easy road access came with the construction in 1962 of State Route 24 through the Fremont River Canyon.[3]


















































< >